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03/05/2011

Flying in India - Part 2

I was talking about flying in India…

And now I am going to talk about the lack of discipline of Indian flyers. (I have not yet mentioned all the throat and digestive noises that you hear nor the sweat smells that you cant’ escape but I won’t).

No, I would like to talk about the landing only.

In India, as soon as the wheels have touched the track, everyone is up – the staff does not react anymore. There is no need to ask them why they rush like this, they all do…

And it can even be dangerous to stand (rebelliously) in the way of someone who wants to grab his bag while you have decided for the doors to open before you move!

This ad is a good illustration of this. I love self-deprecating!

 

03/03/2011

Flying in India - Part 1

It’s bad to laugh at people but this is too good!

 

Here is an article with a compilation of the best comments made by Indian travellers on Virgin airlines… (http://www.mumbaimirror.com/index.aspx?Page=article&sectname=News%20-%20City&sectid=2&contentid=201102082011020802062751495a638d3#ftr2)

 

  • Slow down, plane’s going too fast
  • Need to spit, open the windows
  • A passenger insisted on sleeping in the overhead luggage storage bin. Post dinner, he climbed on his seat and tried getting into the storage bin, thinking planes too have two or three tiers of beds like trains do.
  • Where are the ladies?
  • There is no water  (communément utilisé en Inde à la place du papier toilettes).
  • Phone please, kids are waiting. Passengers would see the crew members using intercom handsets on the flight and mistake them to be telephones.
  • Can I have a Mac Donald’s?
  • On a Los Angeles to London flight, a woman booked a seat for her Barbie doll, which was dressed exactly like her. She even requested for a cup of tea and a massage for the doll.
    An elderly passenger was unable to sleep in the Upper Class and asked for a sleeping pill.
    When that didn’t help, he asked crew to tell the captain to turn off the plane’s engines. Air hostess’ response? “Er.... cannot do that sir, we need the engine to stay airborne.”
  •  On a flight from New York, a female passenger asked, "Is there anything you or the captain can do about this turbulence...?" The crew member replied, "(Virgin Atlantic owner) Richard Branson has a lot of contacts and influence with some very important people, but unfortunately, Mother Nature isn’t one of them...just yet!"

     

    Promise, next time I’ll look for comments by French travellers!!

02/25/2011

Are towers safe?

Building towers is nice… But is it really a good idea??

I was looking for data about earthquake risks in Mumbai and see what I found:

“India ranks second in the world as most exposed country to natural catastrophes; every year, only the seasonal floods affect millions of people. This country is also strongly the place of earthquakes.”

Like if they needed this…

“In India, earthquakes usually happen in the North of the country, in the Himalayan region, where the Indian and Eurasian plates meet. The distortion of this Himalayan zone is important, the Indian plate getting closer to the Eurasian plate at the speed of 4.2 cm per year. In comparison, the African plate is getting closer to the Eurasian plate at the speed of 0.7 cm per year.

On January 26th 2001, an earthquake hpaaned in Kutch area – already destroyed by an earthquake in 1819. This earthquake, the most intense in 50 years, was the most violent to hit India, known as a risky area since 1956. It killed about 300 000 people. The human toll was made bigger by the corruption in the construction sector. The Indian press condemned the improper constructions and the miss in the urbanism plan. Dozens of thousands of people died because of buildings collapsing.”

Well, I’m just saying… Apparently though, we are still safer in Mumbai than in Delhi :

inde_16.jpg

Click on the image to get it bigger.

Sources: http://www.chambon.ac-versailles.fr/science/geol/seism/pays/inde.htm ; http://benoot.com/inde/carte-risques-sismiques-inde-14181-91